Week 13

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What are they selling?

Green Coffee Ultra is FDA registered supplement to help people lose weight. As the website says it is a famous clinical study that was published in the Diabetes,Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity journal. The supplement helps prevent weight gain and protect against the build up of fat in the liver all without changing your diet and exercising.

What’s their reputation?

Green Coffee Ultra’s reputation according to the tab that states “Why We Are #1″ is that they are claiming to be the “#1 Supplement for Weight Loss.” They give seven reasons as to why they are number 1 which is as following:

  • 100% pure green coffee bean extract ( no fillers or binders)
  • Recommended 800mg taken two times daily before meals. (60 capsules)
  • Contains 50% Chlorogenic Acid Green Coffee (key to weight loss)
  • Highest Quality Standards-(FDA registered, cGMP certified laboratory)
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s cGMP
  • US Pharmacopeia integrity (strength & purity of USP quality standards)
  • Risk Free (100% money back guarantee)

The Green Coffee Ultra supplement does have good customer reviews and states that a majority of the customers have lost weight and that they are happy with the product. Overall, I would stay their reputation is somewhat good but the fact that the supplement isn’t FDA approved should be a concern. Its saying that something about the supplement is preventing the FDA from putting it on the list of the approved supplements.

Can I verify?

No i can’t really verify it. First off because its a supplement and I would have to try it in order to see if it works for me too. Many of the sites information as to why a customer should buy the supplement is reused and restated.

Who’s behind it?

The website doesn’t have an About Us tab and doesn’t state anything about the background of the product. It only talks about the studies and research behind the product which gives vague information.

Who’s paying?

The Green Coffee Ultra company itself is paying for the expenses to make their product a success.

Who are the people?

Like I said before the website doesn’t have an About Us page. It doesn’t have the CEO of the company listed or anything to tell the customers about the people behind the product. The people of the company are unknown.

week 13

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What are they selling?

The thundershirt is a wrap-like dog shift that is supposed to calm your canine during thunder storms. The point of the shirt is to wrap your dog very firmly, creating a gentle pressure. This pressure makes dogs feel secure and has a dramatic calming effect. The site claims that eighty percent of dogs show improvement with the product. The shirt is a no medication option. It’s also available for cats, and helps with all types of anxieties like travel anxiety.

What’s their reputation?

The thundershirt site only has a testimonial and success story tab, not a review or ratings page. But even if it did, a review page from the site is very likely going to be bias from moderation. Amazon has about 1800 customer reviews and four stars. The number of individual four to one star ratings are relatively the same, equally proportioned. The number of five star ratings really out numbers the other options, by around triple and quadruple. Blog post reviews and other sites also had positive voices. Many sites said is highly recommended by vets, in my own experience I’ve had it recommended to me by a pet groomer.

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Can I verify?

The product did not work for my dog at all. Tried it several times, and saw absolutely no improvement. Looking at the reviews, most pet owners who talked about it had dogs and cats that would whine and hide in fear during thunderstorms. My Yorkie, however, shows his anxiety by barking. Loud. He also never bites, but is more likely to during a thunder strike. It’s only when I get him to stop barking that he’ll sometimes start shaking in fear. It’s like the saying that goes something along the lines of “there are people whose first instinct is to run away, and those whose first instinct is to attack”. It could be because my Yorkie’s first instinct is to attack that it did not work. I plan to try again at a time he starts shaking. I don’t think my experience is enough information to verify. Just because it did not work with my dog doesn’t mean it doesn’t for others.

Who’s behind it?

The name of the thundershirt’s creator is supposedly Phil Blizzard. I say supposedly, because the name of the person behind the product could not be found on the actual website. This name was found titling a video on youtube, interviewing the thundershirt creator. The last name Blizzard sounds ironic. According to the site, the name of the dog that started it all was Dosi.

Who’s paying? Who are the people?

The company is named after the product, ThunderShirt. According to Linkedin.com, the company was founded in 2009 and is privately held. The size of the company is estimated to be have 11-50 employees.

Week 13

Final Cut Pro is a video editing software that has been used since its first release in 1998. Adobe Premiere developer, Randy Ubilos also created Final Cut Pro which went on to win an Emmy in 2002 for best professional video editing software. In 2011, Apple releases a new version of Final Cut Pro called Final Cut Pro X. This version at first was more a dumbed down version of Final Cut Pro and many professional television editors were very disappointed. But since its first release, Apple has updated and added many of the missing features without losing that more user friendly logo they had advertised this version to be.

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What are they selling?

Apple is selling a video editing software that is branded to be very user friendly and simple but with all of the editing options and tweaks to make professional quality videos.

What is there reputation?

Apple has always had a reputation as simple yet elegant. All of there products are branded as user friendly and compatible for any type of person out there. Final Cut Pro has had a very good reputation for being a well designed video editing software with endless capabilities. But this reputation has had a few minor bumps in the road. When Final Cut Pro X released, there were many complaints about it missing many key features and the design was too simple. Apple and its products have never been advertised as scams and most of their products have succeeded in their designed capabilities.

Can I verify?

Yes. Apple continues to update and improve Final Cut Pro X and the reviews for the product are becoming more and more positive. On the internet, most sites who have good reputations as expert reviewers claim the product is “more powerful and easier to use.” 

Who is behind it?

Apple, a trusted and well known computer hardware and software company. 

Who is paying?

Apple is paying for its advertisements and product development.

Who are the people?

The people are the developers at Apple who keep the product updated and compatible with the latest technology and also Apple’s marketing team who work to specify the benefits of using this software.

 

Week 13

MacKeeper is a software that Mac users can download in order to prevent a plethora of issues. If you own a Mac then you have probably seen this lovely ad pop up from time to time. It claims to instantly clean your computer, provide high-level security, boost performance, and protect your data.

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What are they selling?

An application that will:

  • remove gigabytes of junk from your Mac
  • Protect your Mac from spyware, data loss and even theft
  • Prevent unwanted access to confidential files
  • Boost your Mac’s speed while keeping apps up to date

What’s their reputation?

According to their site’s “expert review,” MacKeeper is a powerful application that can treat all your computer’s maintenance needs. However, if you search other reviews for the application there are numerous Apple discussion boards—including Apple’s official board—that warn against downloading the app. Many talk about the app being a scam. Based on this I would say their reputation is sketchy, at best.

Can I verify?

No. Anything that you click on within the site leads to upgrades, technical support, or more claims of how amazing the product is. Searching the web, there is little positive feedback from what would be considered legitimate sources.

Who’s behind it?

The MacKeeper site has no information about the company. There is no “About Us” link that outlines the company’s mission or how long it has been around.

Who’s paying?

MacKeeper is paying for the site. They are trying to sell a product. Interestingly, they use the Mac icon in multiple locations as well as similar colors (blues and grays) in order to lead anyone visiting the site to believe that the product is indorsed by Mac.

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Who are the people?

The people are the creators of the app who are trying to sell it.

Week 13.

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What are they selling?

- Hairfinity is a company that claims that by taking their pills your hair will grow longer and stronger. They say that their pills contain “essential” vitamins for a healthy body, and a healthy body will lead to healthy hair. They say that their product will protect your hair from breakage, dryness and hair loss.

What’s their reputation?

- Their reputation, according to not just their website but social media as well, is that their vitamin pills work very well. They even have a couple known celebrities that endorse their product on social media sites such as Instagram.

Can I verify?

- Although there seems to be many satisfied customers and they include the vitamins found in their product, I still can’t really verify their claim to be one hundred percent true. Because this product has to be consumed who knows if the desired results last and if the results are consistent no matter the person or type of hair. I am interested in this product because who doesn’t want a healthy body and hair, but there was one review that seemed to disprove Hairfinity’s claim. On top of that, the disclaimer states that the Food and Drug Administration have not evaluated the product, and that the product is by no means a substitute for your doctor.

Who’s behind it?

- Tymeka Lawrence and her husband Brock Lawrence are the founders of the brand Hairfinity, but the brand is sponsored by Brock Beauty Inc. which focuses on delivering natural-based and non-toxic beauty products. Brock Beauty Inc. is also owned by the Lawrence’s.

Who’s paying?

- The Lawrence’s are the ones paying for the website and products. Like I stated before they own Brock Beauty Inc. which is on the contact information page.

Who are the people?

- Tymeka Lawrence was an Electrical Engineer who earned a Bachelor of Science degree as well as a Master of Science degree from the University of New Orleans. Her husband Brock had previously owned a car dealership. That is why Brock manages the business side while Tymeka handles the product development and product lines.

Week 13

In 2008 Reebok released their new shoe called Reebok Tone Ups. The shoe made specific promises to shape your legs and tone your butt. The spokeswoman claimed to have an 11% gain in leg strength, 11% more strength and tone in hamstring muscles and even a 28% improvement and tone for her buttock muscles. These unsupported claims in advertising wound up costing Reebok $25 million worth of refunds to disappointed girls all around the world. There was no scientific study backing up the false advertisement and so the product was recalled. With the way society thinks and lives today, weight-loss advertisements can be very powerful and potentially harmful.

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  1. What are they selling?                                                                                                                                                                                  They were selling sneakers that claimed to tone your lower body but proved otherwise.
  1. What’s their reputation?                                                                                                                                                                            Before the recall of the 2008 Tone Up shoe, Reebok was a well-known and   popular brand that mass-produced athletic shoes, clothes and accessories. Today the company is still popular but less credible.
  1. Can I verify?                                                                                                                                                                                                   Now that the trial is complete and customers have received the $25 million worth of refunds, I can verify that this company created false advertisements to make a profit. You can access this information on hundreds of significant web pages today, for example like the online Women’s Health magazine.
  1. Who’s behind it?                                                                                                                                                                                        Behind this scheme was the Reebok Company. Designers, marketers and advertisers of the Tone Ups are especially guilty for the misinformation.
  1. Who’s paying?                                                                                                                                                                                         Women looking for tone and strength were paying for this product. They were originally the target consumers.  Reebok is now paying it all back.
  1. Who are the people?                                                                                                                                                                                    The people have since been under new management of Adidas.